IBPS Clerk English Questions Expected This Year

1
5636
IBPS Clerk English

IBPS Clerk English Questions Expected This Year

IBPS Clerk English Questions Expected

IBPS Clerk Preliminary Exam is scheduled to be held from November 26th. The number of applicants who have applied for the exam this year is much more higher than last year. So work hard and beat the cut throat competition.

To make things simpler for you, our experts have come up with a list of IBPS Clerk English questions which are important from this year’s exam point of view.

Note: We insist you practice the ‘type’ of IBPS Clerk English questions mentioned below to ensure maximum results. 

All the very best.

IBPS Clerk Exam Pattern

Before you go through the list of IBPS Clerk questions that are expected this year, quickly recap the pattern for the preliminary exam.

Preliminary Objective Test (100 Questions, 100 Marks, 1 Hour)
  • English Language(30 questions, 30 marks)
  • Quantitative Aptitude(35 questions, 35 marks)
  • Reasoning(35 questions, 35 marks)

new VIEW HERE EXPECTED IBPS CLERK CUTOFF 2016

IBPS Clerk English Questions Expected 

Here is the complete list of IBPS Clerk English expected and important questions for IBPS Clerk Preliminary Exam 2016.

Note: The answers have been marked in red.

Directions (Q.1-5) Replace the highlighted words in the IBPS Clerk English statements below with the correct option.

Q1. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s spirited campaign to nail Pakistan and terror groups based on its soil, with a mention of that country being the “mother-ship of terrorism”, virtually fail to secure consensus at the BRICS summit.
1)virtually fails to secure
2) virtually failed to secure
3) virtually failed for secure
4) virtually fail to secured
5) No correction required

Q2. The four-day workshop is being conducted for gearing up administration to the changes that will follow with the implementation of the right to compulsory and Free Education Act 2009.
1) so geared up
2) to gear up
3) forgeared up
4)  to gearing up
5) No correction required

Q3. Government is developing countries are under increasing pressure for the recruiting and training teachers to meet the demand of their rapidly expanding system of education.
1) so as to recruit and train
2) to recruit and train
3)  in the recruiting and training of
4)  for the recruit and train
5) No correction required

Q4. The State administration has to respond in a similar manner and ensure that the authorities concerned keeps the people up to date about the health condition of the Chief Minister.
1) the authorities concern keep
2) the authorities concern to keep
3)  the authority concerned keep
4)  the authorities concerned keep
5) No correction required

Q5. The dim source of light in this otherwise grim picture is that transformational change may in fact be taking place now in several small isolated communities around the world.
1)may in fact be take place now in
2) might in fact be taking place now in
3)  might in fact be taking place now
4)  may in fact taking place now in
5) No correction required

Directions (Q.6-10): IBPS Clerk English Cloze Passage

The day-long ban of NDTV India raises disturbing questions about the status of the freedom of expression, its legality and long-term implications. The statement of the Editors Guild of India explained how the decision to (6) the ban violated the fundamental principles of freedom and justice. This newspaper’s editorial, “Ominous curb on media freedom”, rightly argues for an independent forum to decide violations and that “a committee of officials is not the ideal body to make an independent (7) of what constitutes information that poses an imminent danger to military (8) or civilians”. In the high decibel media (9) , it is important to bear in mind the observations made by Raj Kamal Jha, editor of The Indian Express, in the presence of the Prime Minister. “Good journalism is not dying; it is getting better and bigger. It’s just bad journalism makes lot more noise than it used to do five years ago,” he said.
Is there a way to distinguish good journalism from the bad one? What are the yardsticks? Is an (10) relationship with the government alone a marker of good journalism? From my personal experience as a journalist for three decades, the best visible distinguishing element, among numerous components that make good journalism, is the ability to accept mistakes and offer timely corrections.

 Q6. 

1) prescribed
2) impose
3) disorder
4) displace
5) prevent

Q7.

1) alinged
2) block
3) cure
4) indrance
5) assessment

Q8.

1) forsake
2) personnel
3) dark
4) dull
5) opaque

Q9.

1) evacuation
2) retirement
3) insistent
4) submit
5) bashing

Q10.

1) adversarial
2) inimical
3) rival
4) hostile
5) counter

Directions(Q.11-15): Read the IBPS Clerk English passage below and answer the questions that follow subsequently.

Recent events in the news suggest that the world is growing more insular and polarised. The tragic shooting at Orlando, and Brexit exemplify how intolerance and divisiveness are spreading their tentacles across either side of the Atlantic. Closer home, the racial attacks against Africans in Delhi suggest that India, despite its rich diversity and famed hospitality, also harbours deep prejudices. Ironically, as globalisation and the Internet have in some sense erased geographic boundaries, xenophobic tendencies are only growing more pronounced in various pockets all around the world. Even as we connect with anyone from anywhere, we are more wary of the ‘other.’ But diversity, in all its myriad hues, actually benefits both individuals and societies. So, we must fight the narrow forces that push for homogeneity.
In an article published in The New York Times, in December 2015, researchers Sheen Levine and David Stark describe a set of experiments that suggest that ethnic and racial diversity enhances the decision-making abilities of people. By simulating a stock market in diverse versus homogeneous groups, the researchers were able to study the impact of diversity. When participants were in a diverse group, they were 58% per cent more accurate in determining the true value of stocks. According to the authors, ethnic diversity, be it in Texas or Singapore where the study was conducted, allowed people to make better decisions. When participants were in an ethnically homogenous group, they tended to mimic the behaviour of other participants, often copying their mistakes as well. On the other hand, in a diverse group, people tended to be more discerning and less likely to follow the crowd.
In a 2012 issue of Observer, scholars Douglas Medin and Carol Lee argue that apart from concerns over for social equality, diversity has an elemental role to play in the sciences. Multiple perspectives at all stages of the scientific enterprise, from choosing what to study, methods one adopts, to interpreting results, can provide new insights. For example, they cite the work of Sarah Hrdy who makes the point that when female primatologists entered the field, fresh insights regarding primate behaviour emerged.
Another example of the merits of a different viewpoint is the work of Temple Grandin who came up with an ingenious and humane method for livestock handling and slaughter. Grandin, who has autism, has extraordinary visualization skills. She attributes the success of her unconventional design that transformed the livestock industry to her ability to see the process from the perspective of cattle. In an interview, published in the Daily Mail in 2011, Grandin says, “It was important to see what the cattle see, so I could address what made them anxious.”
In an article published in Scientific American in 2014, Professor Katherine Phillips, who teaches at Columbia Business School, argues that diversity entails more than just bringing to the table, different perspectives. In fact, knowing that others in a group may not share beliefs or viewpoints, compels individuals to change their behaviour. She cites a 2006 study conducted by social psychologist Samuel Sommers that involved mock jury trials. When the juries had mixed races, jurors were more deliberate in their discussion and more open to considering the role of race in the case. In addition, they were more accurate in recalling facts of the case.
Thus, Phillips argues that diversity compels us to work harder. Just by being in a diverse group, we expect others to think differently from us, and are more prepared to address alternative viewpoints. As Phillips writes, “People work harder in diverse environments,” which can “lead to better outcomes.”
To be a truly open society, we need to embrace diversity in all forms. Language, religion, race, gender and sexual orientation are only some of the dimensions on which human beings differ. Being gay, author Andrew Solomon always thought that he belonged to “a fairly slim minority.” In his book, Far from the Tree, he says that as he encountered people from other marginalised groups, from the deaf to dwarfs and child prodigies, he had an epiphany and realised that “Difference unites us.” In fact, if we take all types of differences into account, we realise that the “exceptional is ubiquitous.”

Q11. Which of the following is TRUE according to the passage?
1) Solomon writes, People work harder in diverse environments, which can lead to better outcomes
2) Phillips always thought that he belonged to “a fairly slim minority
3) Grandin says, It was important to see what the cattle see, so I could address what made them anxious
4) Only 2 and 3
5) Only1 and 2

Q12. Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word prejudices as used in the passage.
1) fairness
2) tolerance
3) detriment
4) respect
5) regard

Q13. According to the author, enhances the decision-making abilities of people?
1) ethnic and racial diversity
2) rich diversity and famed hospitality
3) diversity entails more than just bringing to the table, different perspectives
4)
5) Not mentioned in the passage

Q14. Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word discerning as used in the passage.
1) percipient
2) overlooking
3) entrailing
4) undiscriminating
5) undiscerning

Q15. Which of the following is FALSE according to the passage?
1) To be a truly open society, we need to embrace diversity in all forms
2) Even as we connect with anyone from anywhere, we are more wary of the ‘other.’
3) Just by being in a diverse group, we expect others to think differently from us, and are more prepared to address alternative viewpoints
4) When the juries had mixed races, jurors were more deliberate in their discussion and more open to considering the role of race in the case
5) None of these

VIEW HERE IBPS CLERK QUANTITATIVE APTITUDE EXPECTED QUESTIONS

VIEW HERE IBPS CLERK REASONING ABILITY EXPECTED QUESTIONS